Best Cancer Treatment Medicines

Keytruda 50mg

Best Cancer Medicines

There are people asking what is the  Best Cancer Treatment Medicines. Drugs approved by the FDA for specific types of cancer are listed on this page. The drug names link to NCI’s information summaries about these drugs. The pages are updated when new cancer drugs are approved. See Drugs Approved for Cancers.

What is Keytruda

Keytruda, is a humanized antibody used in cancer immunotherapy that treats melanoma, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, stomach cancer, cervical cancer, and certain types of breast cancer. It is given by slow injection into a vein.
Keytruda is a cancer medicine that interferes with the growth and spread of cancer cells in the body.
Keytruda is used alone or in combination with other medicines to treat certain types of cancer.

Keytruda is often given when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, or cannot be treated with surgery or radiation, or when other cancer treatments did not work or have stopped working.
For some types of cancer, pembrolizumab is given only if your tumor tests positive for “PD-L1”, or if the tumor has been tested for a specific genetic marker.

Warnings

Keytruda can change the way your immune system works, which may cause certain side effects that can lead to serious medical problems.
Keytruda can cause side effects in many different parts of your body. Some side effects may need to be treated with other medicine, and your cancer treatments may be delayed. You will need frequent medical tests to help your doctor determine if it is safe for you to keep receiving Keytruda.
Call your doctor at once if you have: skin problems, vision problems, fever, swollen glands, neck stiffness, chest pain, cough, shortness of breath, muscle or joint pain, pale skin, weakness, diarrhea, severe stomach pain, blood in your stools, bruising or bleeding, dark urine, yellowing of the skin or eyes, a hormonal disorder (frequent headaches, feeling light-headed, rapid heartbeats, a deeper voice, increased thirst or urination, feeling cold, weight gain or loss), or a change in the amount or color of your urine.

Before taking Keytruda

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:
lung disease or a breathing disorder;
liver disease;
diabetes, or a thyroid disorder;
an adrenal gland disorder;
an autoimmune disorder such as lupus, Crohn’s disease, or ulcerative colitis; or
an organ transplant or stem cell transplant.
You may need to have a negative pregnancy test before starting this treatment. Do not use Keytruda if you are pregnant. Pembrolizumab could harm the unborn baby. Use effective birth control to prevent pregnancy while you are using this medicine and for at least 4 months after your last dose. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant.
Do not breastfeed while using pembrolizumab, and for at least 4 months after your last dose.

How is Keytruda 50mg given

Keytruda is given as an infusion into a vein, usually once every 3 weeks or every 6 weeks. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.
Your doctor will perform a blood test to make sure Keytruda is the right treatment for your condition.
This medicine must be given slowly, and the infusion can take at least 30 minutes to complete.
You will need frequent medical tests to help your doctor determine if it is safe for you to keep receiving Keytruda. Do not miss any follow-up visits.

Dosing Information For Keytruda

Usual Adult Dose for Malignant Melanoma:
Monotherapy for unresectable or metastatic melanoma: 200 mg IV every 3 weeks OR 400 mg IV every 6 weeks
-Administer as IV infusion over 30 minutes until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity
Adjuvant treatment of melanoma: 200 mg IV every 3 weeks OR 400 mg IV every 6 weeks
-Administer as IV infusion over 30 minutes until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or up to 12 months
Uses:
-Treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma
-Adjuvant treatment of patients with melanoma with Stage IIB, IIC, or III melanoma following complete resection.
Usual Adult Dose for Melanoma — Metastatic:
Monotherapy for unresectable or metastatic melanoma: 200 mg IV every 3 weeks OR 400 mg IV every 6 weeks
-Administer as IV infusion over 30 minutes until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity
Adjuvant treatment of melanoma: 200 mg IV every 3 weeks OR 400 mg IV every 6 weeks
-Administer as IV infusion over 30 minutes until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or up to 12 months
Uses:
-Treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma
-Adjuvant treatment of patients with melanoma with Stage IIB, IIC, or III melanoma following complete resection.
Usual Adult Dose for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer:
MONOTHERAPY: 200 mg IV every 3 weeks OR 400 mg IV every 6 weeks
-Administer as IV infusion over 30 minutes until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or up to 24 months
COMBINATION THERAPY: 200 mg IV every 3 weeks OR 400 mg IV every 6 weeks
-Administer as IV infusion over 30 minutes until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or up to 24 months
-Administer this drug prior to chemotherapy when given on the same day
Uses:
-As a single agent for the first-line treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) expressing PD-L1 (Tumor Proportion Score [TPS] 1% or greater) as determined by an FDA-approved test with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations, and is stage III where patients are not candidates for surgical resection or definitive chemoradiation OR metastatic
-As a single agent for the treatment of patients with metastatic NSCLC whose tumors express PD-L1 (TPS 1% or greater) as determined by an FDA-approved test with disease progression on or after platinum-containing chemotherapy; patients with EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to receiving this drug
-In combination with pemetrexed and platinum chemotherapy for first-line treatment of metastatic NSCLC with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.
-In combination with carboplatin and either paclitaxel or paclitaxel protein-bound for first-line treatment of patients with metastatic squamous NSCLC.
Usual Adult Dose for Head and Neck Cancer:
MONOTHERAPY: 200 mg IV every 3 weeks OR 400 mg IV every 6 weeks
-Administer as IV infusion over 30 minutes until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or up to 24 months
COMBINATION THERAPY: 200 mg IV every 3 weeks OR 400 mg IV every 6 weeks
-Administer as IV infusion over 30 minutes until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or up to 24 months
-Administer this drug prior to chemotherapy when given on the same day
Uses:
-As a single agent for first line treatment of patients with metastatic or unresectable recurrent head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) whose tumors express PD-L1 (Combined Positive Score [CPS] greater than or equal to 1) as determined by an FDA-approved test
-As a single agent for treatment of patients with recurrent or metastatic HNSCC with disease progression on or after platinum-containing chemotherapy.
-In combination with platinum and fluorouracil for first-line treatment of patients with metastatic or with unresectable, recurrent HNSCC.

Keytruda side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Keytruda: (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash with blistering and peeling). Buy Keytruda Injection Online
Some side effects may occur during the injection. Tell your caregiver if you feel dizzy, light-headed, itchy, hot, sweaty, chilled, or have trouble breathing.
Pembrolizumab affects your immune system, and can cause side effects in many different parts of your body. Some side effects may need to be treated with other medicine.

 

 

Open chat
1
Hello 👋
Welcome to our site, if you need help simply reply to this message, we are online and ready to help.